This Is What Happened During The Chicago Marathon

It started six months ago. I had just watched my friends run apologetically and fearlessly during the Boston Marathon. Then I watched Beyonce's visual album Lemonade and found myself inspired to believe in myself and go head to head with the voice in my head that said I wasn't capable of training for and then running a Boston Marathon qualifying time (BQ). 

BQ or Bust was born and the next thing I knew, I had the faith and support of my new coach Josh Maio and I took my first few steps toward an impossible. My marathon PR (personal record) was 3 hours, 59 minutes, and 37 seconds and in order to qualify for Boston, I had to run under 3 hours and 35 minutes. That meant shaving off 24 minutes and 37 seconds, almost 1 minute per mile. It felt impossible, scary and ludicrous. I hated running fast and I didn't believe I had the will power, strength, or confidence to stick with a structured training plan to make it happen.

But I trusted Josh and six long months later, I feel very different today than the person I was when I made that first vlog. 

It's hard to put into words what I went through over the past 6 months. But before I knew it, I was in Chicago and 48 hours away from crossing the starting line.

I was scared, nervous and excited to see what was going to happen. I spent the day before the race wracked with nerves and excitement. I had the most amazing #SportsBraSquad shakeout run and was given a chance to hang out with over 130 people who were following my journey. It was incredible, humbling, and inspiring. And getting to talk to all of you reminded me that I wasn't alone and that regardless of what happened on race day, I had already won.

My goal was 3:35. I took off ready to cross the finish line under 3 hours and 35 minutes. The race itself is a total and complete blur. 

And then I crossed the finish line in 3 hours 41 minutes and 09 seconds. I don't want to spend too much time writing about what happened because everything I want to say about the race is right here in this video. 

At the end of the day, it's all about no regrets. My finishing time is irrelevant. I don't care about running fast, I care about running my heart out. That was the goal. My goal was to push myself to a place that I didn't believe I was capable of going. Not only did I have to fight to get to that place but I had to fight with every fiber of my being to stay there and to push through it. And I did. 

No, I didn't BQ during the Chicago Marathon but words fail to describe how proud and accomplished I feel knowing that I gave 100% and left my heart on the course.

BQ or Bust doesn't end here. It's going to happen next year during the London Marathon. Without a doubt because why not! I refuse to stop until I prove to myself that running a BQ isn't impossible. I'm almost there! I not only refuse to give up now but I truly believe that I can do it. 

The only way anything is impossible is if you fail to believe in yourself. No regrets. No excuses.

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

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Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.