June 23, 2009

I'll never forget the paralyzing terror that washed over me when I answered the phone call that changed my life seven years ago today. It's the only moment that I wish I could forget but it's seared vividly into my memory. I was standing next to my bed in my college apartment when I saw an incoming call from my Dad. I knew from the moment the phone reached my ear that something terrible had happened. I said Dad four times before he finally responded. His voice wavered as he tried to be strong for me but shattered when he was forced to speak the text. Heartbroken is the only word I can use to describe how he sounded when he told me that my brother Scott had died.

I remember bits and pieces of what happened that day. Imagine the worst day of your life and then multiple that by 100, that's what that first week was like. It didn't feel real. It felt like a nightmare. No one knew what to do. We were broken and helpless. The unimaginable had happened to us and we couldn't do anything about.

The finality of his loss never actually settled. The moments when it does, it's almost like parachuting but your parachute doesn't open and you go hurling towards the earth, eventually crashing hard into the hard surface. It happens less frequently now than it did those first few years, but it still happens. It comes often times out of the blue and often when I'm out in public. 

June 23rd will always be the one day of the year that I dread with every fiber of my being. It's really hard to describe what living with my loss is like. My brother was the funniest person I'd ever met. He is (was? Right there, the finality of having to use was is like being stabbed with a knife.) He was the only person who could make me laugh with a single look. My biggest fear is that I will forget what his voice sounded like or that my memories will fade.

I spend a lot of my time thinking about what would have been. It's impossible not to. I think about where he would be if he were still with us today. Whenever I'm feeling particularly grief stricken and nostalgic, especially on anniversaries or holidays which are exponentially difficult, I think about what my Brother would say to me if he saw me hysterical. The last thing he'd want me to do is crawl into bed and cry, pining after what could have been. And then he'd probably laugh at me because Scott wasn't one to sit back and cry, he was always on the lookout for the next adventure and the next laugh. He'd want me to push forward and find joy. To smile through my tears and find hope instead of sorrow.

There is no one way to grieve. The way I grieve is very different from my sister, mom and dad.  For a long time, I was spiteful, angry, sad and empty. But eventually, I was grateful for the time I had with Scott, however short it was. I feel so lucky that I had him for as long as I did. Every memory I have with him puts a smile on my face. Scott's death was the worst day of my life and I would give anything to have him back with me today. There's no question about that. But it's impossible to go something so life changing without having a renewed outlook on life. Scott's untimely death taught me grab my own life by the horns. I wanted to share a few things with you all because as hard as it is to believe, our time with one another really is limited and it's important that we set out every single day to make the most of it.

Love unapologetically. You cannot play it safe when it comes to your heart. I don't believe in playing games. Invest in your relationships with your friends, your family, and your significant others. It takes hard work and time that so many of us don't have, but it's important. And when you fall in love, run towards it. Don't wait for someone else to call the shots, be a team. It's called falling in love not gently wading into love right? Be the first person to say I love you.  Please, please, please be unapologetic with your love. It's a gift! The best gifts are given when you expect nothing in return! Give your love as often as you can. You never know when it may be the last time you get to say it to someone. I am forever grateful that the last thing I said to my brother was I love you. I wish I could say it a thousand more times.

Don't endure, thrive. If you're in a situation that isn't fulfilling you creatively, intellectually, or if you dread it, stop doing it. Take a leap of faith and figure out what you can do to make every single day a little more than ordinary. If you hate your job and can't change it, find a side passion that gives you life and something to look forward to. Volunteer. Write. Draw. Join a community theater production. Do something for other people. Make the world a better place however you can. Whatever you do, don't do something that's comfortable and easy. Step outside of your comfort zone because that is where the magic lives.

SEE THE WORLD. How often do we come up with excuses not to travel? Make traveling a priority, even if that means going an hour north, south, east or west. Round up your people and go experience the world together. Make memories because they're all you'll have when all is said and done. For a few years after Scott's passing, I was afraid to do anything. I felt like I needed to stay safe and alive for my parents and my sister. Death loomed around every corner and I was too terrified to take risks or to be carefree. Now I realize that accidents happen. Terrible awful things happen. If you don't take advantage of the time you have, you're doing yourself a disservice. Be safe but don't be afraid to live your life to the fullest. Don't make excuses not to explore the world together. 

Don't sweat the small stuff. We spend so much time preoccupied with stupid sh*t that really has no business in our lives. If someone makes you unhappy, distance yourself from them. Stop trying to please other people. Ask yourself, "What do I want?" every single day. Write it down. Then ask yourself, "Am I happy?" Write that down. Look to the world with wonder. Judge people less. Don't sweat the small stuff. Hold on tightly, let go lightly. Ask questions. And most importantly, stop trying to figure everything out because the second you thing you've figure it all out, life is going to knock you onto your ass. Stay curious, open, and as carefree as possible.

Running is a lot like grief. It never gets easier, you just get stronger and over time, the pain becomes a part of you. Being able to find joy and a sense of purpose in something that was hard, painful and seemingly impossible saved me. When I miss my brother, instead of crawling into bed with a pan of brownies, I throw on some sunglasses and lace up my running shoes. Running helps me slow down and check in. Even though Scott isn't with me physically anymore, I feel like I'm with him when I run. I can talk to him, tell him that I love him, or just look up. It's really easy for me to fall into the rabbit hole if I'm stagnant but the best way to pull myself out is when I'm physically moving forward. And what better way to move forward than to put one foot in front of the other?

Hug your people extra tight today. Call your family, both blood and chosen, and tell them how much you love them. Share a memory and a laugh. And please remember, you never know what someone is going through so try to be kind and patient. Give people the benefit of the doubt. They may be struggling to keep it together, seconds away from falling apart, like I am today.

I miss you so much Scott. What I would give to have you back again. I will never let your memory fade. I can't wait to see you again, it's only a matter of time.

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

3 Comments

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

How To Get and Stay Motivated

Are you someone who dreads working out? I want to talk specifically to you because I used to be you. Look, Instagram and Pinterest have glamorized the idea of working out. Even I am guilty of glamorizing working out! See? Here I am fake running --

How To Stay Motivated

Notice anything missing? Yeah, the look of pain and anguish on my face! And the sweat! You guys, I look absolutely nothing like the above picture when I run. This is how I look 89% of the time --

How To Stay Motivated

For me, running wasn't about putting one foot in front of the other. It wasn't about making it through the first mile, it was about digging really, really, really deep to force myself to stick with something that felt unnatural and impossible. In fact, if I'm being honest, those first few months of running were awful. I was slow. I felt like my legs weighed a million pounds! I assumed that every car that drove by was judging me or feeling sorry for me. I would get side cramps every 10 minutes and I spent more times crying on street corners because I was still a mile or two from home. It wasn't fun. For every "OK" run, there were 6 bad ones. But luckily, I was so miserable and unhappy with what I was doing with my life that suffering through a 1-3 mile run sounded like a better idea than the pity party I was used to throwing 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

I always say that I was just desperate enough to become a runner but looking back, I didn't have the motivation to push through the doubts to motivate myself to stick with it. If you're struggling to find the motivation to to get active (and actually enjoy yourself in the process), I have 6 tips for you.

1. Make your goal tangible.

How To Stay Motivated

Register for your first half marathon and then find a training plan that maps out every single day of your training or join the couch to 5K challenge. Set a goal to attend a fitness class like spinning, barre, yoga, or swimming at least 3 days a week for an entire month. (And if you still don't enjoy it after a month, try something else! Working out is a lot more fun when you actually like what you're doing. Who knew?!?) Having a tangible goal will not only give you something to work towards, but it helps you learn how to enjoy the journey instead of waiting for it be over.

2. Find an #accountabilibuddy.

How To Stay Motivated

Don't do it alone if you don't have to! Recruit a coworker to take a class with you after work twice a week. Ask your squad if they'd like to join you for a dawn patrol spin class once a week. Find a group of people to walk or run with. Even if your support system is online, having people to talk to helps you stay accountable. It's a game changer. Find an accountabilibuddy and then work together to accomplish your goals!

3. Don't get frustrated when it gets hard.

How To Stay Motivated

Look, getting active sucks. Being new at anything isn't fun so don't act surprised when everything hurts and you feel like you're dying. When I was getting started, people who made working out or running look easy frustrated me to no end. I felt like I was the only person in the world struggling. Ignore the people who make it look effortless. Don't compare yourself to anyone. Just focus on your weekly goals and march to the beat of your own drum. It's all about patience, persistence, and perseverance. WHATEVER YOU DO, DO NOT GIVE UP.

4. CELEBRATE EVERY SINGLE WIN.

How To Stay Motivated

The days when you'd rather skip a 30 minute run to watch Netflix after a 12 hour day at work but begrudgingly make it happen? CELEBRATE THAT. Do a little dance, buy yourself a headband, or post a sweatie selfie proclaiming that you're a boss. The days when you wake up, hit snooze, and then drag yourself out of bed? YUP, YOU GUESSED IT, CELEBRATE IT! When you run your first mile without having to stop to walk? YOU BETTER BELIEVE YOU CELEBRATE IT! The power of positive self talk is magic. In fact, every time you look in mirror just silently say to yourself, "I am so strong." Just do it. I promise you it will change your life.

5. Find what works for you.

Don't feel too intimidated to try something new. Ask someone how to use weights at the gym. Try a new class that scares the sh*t out of you. (My first few times in a spin class? A train wreck. Now it's my favorite thing in the world.) Just last week I went to my first Pilates reformer class with my friend Lottie and I was a hot mess. I couldn't do half of the exercises and I almost fell off of my machine two (OK FINE THREE) times. There's safety in numbers so if you're nervous about looking stupid, bring your silliest friend (or anyone who will come for that matter). I hate this idea that the only people who should go to the gym are the people who are ripped or who know what they're doing. No one is judging. Everyone has to start somewhere!

6. Stop working out to hit a number on a scale or for a "bikini body".

I spent well over a decade struggling in a gym trying to look like the girls I saw in fitness magazines. Tiny waists, perfectly toned quads, jogging around in their sports bras and tiny shorts. I wanted to be able to wear a sports bra like they did. I wanted to wear tiny shorts and not have my thighs chafe. It wasn't until I started running that my idea of what strength looks like became a realistic expectation. My goal went from being able to run confidently in a sports bra to just being able to look in the mirror and not feel disappointed in what I saw. I look nothing like the girls you see on the Instagram channels of our favorite brands but now I know that their indication of it and strength is one sided. I know that just because I don't see myself in the industry norm doesn't mean I'm not strong. I was miserable working out to hit an unrealistic number on a scale. But working towards a goal time or a finish line? That motivates me and makes me feel empowered. Don't worry about your weight, it will take care of itself.

Life is too short. Stop wasting your time dreading every moment you have to spend in a gym so that you can look desirable for someone else. The only person who needs to love you, is you and here's the best part; you're already the best version of you right now. Unless you know how to time travel, the only body you have is the one you've got today. So ask yourself, what do I want? What sort of challenge excites you? Pick one that terrifies you because it's in discomfort where change lives. Then take it one single day at a time.

It's all about putting your strongest foot forward. Go kick ass. Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

 

 

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Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

I'm Allowed To Be Disappointed In Myself

To watch BQ Or Bust 015 on YouTube, CLICK HERE.

Look, I AM ALLOWED TO BE DISAPPOINTED IN MYSELF. Anyone who has set a goal, put in the work, and then didn't give 100% knows how disappointing it is should you fall short. I have abad habit of making excuses when I don't accomplish my goals. I hold myself back and then I convince myself that it wasn't my fault. The worst thing I can do right now is tell myself that I had a bad day or use any excuse to justify the fact that I didn't push myself when the final 2 miles got hard.

Before going into the Queens 10K, my goal was to run a sub 47 minute 10K. I've done it in practice, and I ran a similar time last weekend on a very hilly course. It was 100% doable. But the morning of the race, we were late. Like REALLY late. We crossed the starting line 30 minutes after the race began and we spent 5 miles weaving in and around other runners. And it was hot. And my shorts were riding up so my thighs were chafing. And I was thirsty. And every time I looked at my watch, I panicked. I've got about 100 more excuses to justify the moment when I gave up during the race but you get the idea. There's always a really good excuse.

At mile 4 I gave up. Instead of pushing like I did last weekend, I wasn't present. I didn't even fight to stay with it, I just stopped pushing myself and ran. That's what happens when you stop being present. I was so focused on getting the race over with that I gave up on myself. And that's why I'm disappointed.

Giving up sucks. It sucks that I gave myself an out and then took it. There have been so many times over the years when I've given up. From the millions of times I tried and failed to lose weight to being in school and I used excuses to justify my lack of care and hard work. I have to be disappointed in myself so that when I want to give up, I remember how sh*tty I feel. Remember last week the high I felt after I finished? I want that feeling of accomplishment to speak louder than getting comfortable and giving up when the discomfort sets in.

It's all about stakes. If you don't attach stakes to your goals, you won't feel compelled to make them happen. And that means feeling disappointed if you fall short. But I'm not going to sit here and hold a pity party. It's time to brush myself off and push on. BQ'ing isn't going to be easy. I knew that. But quitting now would be infinitely harder. I want this. I want to see if I can do this which is why I'm refocusing on the goal and I'm going to push through this set back. Giving up is always an option but so is going forward.

It's not about how badly you want something. It's about how hard you're willing to work for it. I can talk a big game. BELIEVE ME, I can hype BQ'ing until the cows come home but if I can't do the work, than it will never happen. Sure I want this but it's time to see if I'm willing to really work for it. It's now or never.

Have you subscribed to my YouTube channel yet? If you're digging BQ or Bust, don't forget to subscribe!

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

Comment

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

BQ Or Bust 014 Running Never Gets Easier, You Have To Have Fun

To watch BQ or Bust 014 on YouTube, CLICK HERE.

FINALLY! A BREAKTHROUGH!

When I was getting ready to run the NYRR's Oakly Mini 10K, I didn't have a goal. My coach Josh Maio didn't give me any splits to hit or specific instructions like start fast and get faster which to me meant that he wanted me to have fun. (I'm not totally sure if that's what he wanted, I should have asked but I was excited about running for fun.) So I toed the line with a bunch of my friends and we took off ready to have fun.

I was loud, energetic, and most importantly, I was having a great time! I was hooting and hollering at each mile mark and when we hit mile 2, I realized I was on track for a PR so I decided to go for it. The race was HARD. Easy is not a word I would describe what I experienced but the high I felt after hitting my goal was UNPARALLELED. I was finally able to push through the discomfort and get myself to pick up the pace even though I wanted nothing more than to pull back and get comfortable.

I felt incredible and it was a big day for me. I really needed to prove to myself that I was able to get uncomfortable and hit my time goal. I have such an easier time running by feel in lieu of running to hit splits on my watch. Whenever I look at my watch, I get overwhelmed or frustrated! I worry about falling short or going too fast. Then I stop being present and I panic and then I stop having fun.

When I have fun, that's when I'm most present. I don't focus on the next mile, I focus on what is happening in the moment and being present is the secret to running. I've put a lot of pressure on myself to have a "good day". While I think there are good days, I have to stop using them as an excuse for the days when I fall short. Running faster or stronger is never going to be comfortable. I will never get strong enough for that faster pace to feel easy. I need to just go for it and remember that the feeling I get after I finish is infinitely more rewarding than the discomfort I feel during. That high and sense of accomplishment makes every painful step worth it.

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

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Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

BQ Or Bust 013 The Mental Block

CLICK HERE to watch BQ OR Bust 013 on YouTube.

It's no secret that running is a mental game. It's not about how strong you are, strength is just a tiny piece of the puzzle, running is really about how strong your mind is. Something I learned when I was out in Los Angeles with November Project Los Angeles, killing the stairs of the Hollywood Bowl, was that I was a lot stronger than I was giving myself credit for. I would look up before a workout and immediately tell myself that I wouldn't be able to run the stairs. Then I'd get started and with the help of the people around me, I would push myself to not only complete the workout, but to finish strong. I realized that I wasn't just defining what I was and wasn't capable of doing, but I wasn't working on that muscle in my brain that tells me to pull back when I get uncomfortable.

The more I ran stairs, the harder I pushed myself. I thought I'd worked through my mental block but recently, it reared it's ugly head again. I'm still having a really hard time pushing myself when I get uncomfortable. I tell myself that I'm tired and that it would be easier to just run at a slower pace, so I do. Or I see my finish line, the top of a hill, or the end of an interval and pull back instead of finishing strong. It's disappointing and really annoying but it's something I'm working on. These changes don't happen overnight. If it were easy, it wouldn't be worth it, right?

How do you push yourself through mental blocks? Let me know in the comments below!

And don't forget to subscribe to my YouTube Channel if you're enjoying BQ OR BUST! Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

Comment

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

Dear Dude Who Wrote "Don’t Run a Marathon"

Dear dude who wrote "Don't Run A Marathon",

Dude. What is up! You sound angry, are you OK? How much time and research went into that piece? Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but anyone who wants to run a marathon can not and will not be dissuaded from running a marathon. I hate to say it, but writing that piece was probably a waste of time (and I know how strongly you feel about wasting time). 

Personally, I never saw the hundreds of hours I spend training for marathons as a waste of time. If anything, it gave me a reason to wake up in the morning and an excuse to say no to the endless happy hours or weekend's spent in bars drinking. You think running a marathon is extravagant? Spend a few hours with some of my New York friends. They drop $250 drinking and dining every weekend. Now instead of flushing money down a boozy toilet, I run marathons and I get to spend my time with a diverse group of people who are committed to bettering themselves in every way possible. I prefer the latter to the former, but that's just me.  

Dude, I feel like I should let you in on the secret. Ready? No one runs a marathon to get likes on a social media post. No one runs a marathon so that they can bask in the support of thousands of spectators. No one runs a marathon to actually lose weight or to find their purpose. Those are all KICK ASS side effects that come with training for and then running a marathon! (OK fine, I'd be lying if I didn't admit that a part of me was motivated to finish my first marathon so that I could walk into a super bowl party and tell my ex that I ran a marathon after he broke up with me. But that was mid race motivation, not the reason I decided to run a marathon. I regret nothing. The look on his face made every single awful step worth it.) 

Running a marathon is a very personal experience and it's not up for debate. You don't choose to run a marathon, you feel compelled to. Running a marathon saved my life. Had I not run a marathon, I'm not sure I would have found a reason to live. Had I not run a marathon, I doubt I would have found the courage to pick up and move to New York City. Had I not run a marathon, I don't think I would have learned how to look in the mirror and love what I saw. Had I not run a marathon, I'm positive that I would have packed on the 75+ pounds I gained after my 16 year old brother tragically passed away. Should I keep going? Because I can keep going...

I guess I don't understand what the goal of your piece was. I mean, if someone really loves doing something or feels compelled to run a marathon, why tell them that their goal to be a better person is invalid? If anything, go after the people holding themselves back, too afraid to take life by the horns. I was one of those people and I can tell you that it sucks. It's a terrifying, depressing, and paralyzing existence and I feel a lot happier working to put my strongest foot forward than I did spending my time trying to keep up with the Kardashians. But again, to each their own! Who am I to tell someone how to live their life? 

You call training for a marathon a wasted opportunity. I don't think you quite understand why people run marathons. It's not about training to do something hard, it's about pushing yourself and proving that you're stronger than you think. Ask anyone who has trained for and then run a marathon if the experience was even close to what they expected and I guarantee that you will get a "F*CK NO". You spend hours upon hours outside of your comfort zone when you train for a marathon, how could you not walk away from the experience enlightened and changed?

Dude, if someone has decided to run a marathon, there is nothing you can do to convince them that it's a bad idea. I get where you're coming from but like I said, you're wasting your time. Time that could be spent, to borrow your words, "Acquir(ing) a new language, learn(ing) to code, becom(ing) a better cook, master(ing) swing dancing, finish(ing) a draft of that novel". But I run marathons (last year I ran 3), work a full time job, find time to be with my friends and I'm halfway through the first draft of my first book! OH AND I dance more than anyone I know. So there is enough time to have it all because if there's one thing runners are good at, it's time management. But you wouldn't know that because you don't run.

Sorry you wasted so much time. :(

Best,

-- Kelly

9 Comments

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

The Definitive List of Funny Roberts Family Spectator Signs

If hilarious race day spectator signs were an Olympic sport, my family would be on the 2016 #RoadToRio. In need of some funny race day sign suggestions? Here are my favorite Roberts family race day spectator signs ranked from "Still funny" to "Hold on while I catch my breath because I'm laughing so hard" as of June 2016. (I'll add to the list as more signs are made.) Ready? LET'S DO THIS --

15. Run like Maury just told you, "You are the father!".

14. If Kate Middleton looked like she did yesterday, you can finish.

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

13. Marathon and chill?

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

12. Run like Prince Harry runs from commitment.

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

For those international races...

11. Free wifi ahead, run faster.

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

10. Need $ for next marathon. Please help. God bless.

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

9. Free marathon foto coupon codes ahead. RUN FASTER!

8. Run like millennials run from commitment.

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

7. Have you seen Kelly anyone? How far back is Kelly?

**Bonus points for execution Mom.**

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

A classic...

6. That bad tinder date's behind you, run faster!

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

5. Take your time...we have enough beer to last us another 4 hours!

4. Damn runners back at it again with the marathon.

3. Run like Kim Kardashian runs from untouched selfies.

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

2. Free Hamilton tickets at the finish line!

(Now you know why I ran a huge PR at the New York City half marathon this year.)

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

And the sign that I don't think will ever be topped...

1. John -- You're a cheating bastard!

Funny Race Day Spectator Signs That Will Make You LOL

What is the funniest race day sign you've ever seen?

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

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Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

How Can This Happen.

This weekend in Orlando Florida, 50 people were slaughtered in a night club. 50. 50 human beings were murdered. It's a senseless and unthinkable act that could have been prevented.

I can not pretend to understand why anyone would want to fight gun reform. While I don't understand why anyone would want to own a gun, I respect the fact that their outlook is different than mine and that banning guns entirely isn't a viable solution to our problem. I understand that people want the right to own and carry a fire arm. Just because I don't understand or agree with it doesn't mean that I think they are wrong. I can disagree but still respect their second amendment right. But it's disappointing to read that so many people do not believe that the accessibility of fire arms aren't a part of the problem. Gun violence is an incredibly complicated issue. There is no black and white answer. But guns are a piece of the puzzle and we are being selfish and closed minded when we fight reform.

In 2009, I received a traumatic phone call that forever changed who I am as a human being and my life as I knew it. My Father called to tell me that there had been a tragic accident and that my Brother had passed away. Every time I read about a shooting, I think about the families and friends who had to get that phone call. Or worse, read their loved one's name on a list. I think about all the people who will never get to hug their person again. All the holidays they have to try to celebrate and get through in spite of their loss. The hell that is sitting somewhere when a tidal wave of grief comes out of no where and catapults you into a level of grief that is so overwhelming and paralyzing that it makes it hard to get through the day. Because the grief they have to live with doesn't go away. It doesn't get better or less intense, it will stay with them and be apart of them forever.

I always want to ask the people fighting against gun reform how they can put themselves and their needs before so many people who are being robbed of life. How they can put their desire to hunt or to "defend them self" before all of the lives tragically stolen. I want to ask these people if they have lost someone suddenly and unfairly and if they know what living in spite of an unthinkable loss is like because if they did, I can't imagine how they could sit by while people all over the country, are losing their loved ones to gun violence. It doesn't make sense to me that anyone who knows how terrible it is to move forward when you've unfairly lost someone could fight against gun reform.

My heart breaks for all the lives lost to gun violence. For all the loves, memories, milestones, and laughs that those murdered will never get to experience. And my heart shatters for all the family members and friends who now have to try to survive their tragic loss. Because their lives will never be the same. Every day will hurt. Every. Single. Fucking. Day.

It's unthinkable. It's unfair. And we need to figure it out. It won't happen unless we come together and listen to both sides and then put the greater good first because people are being slaughtered and we're not doing anything about it.

Life is precious. Tomorrow is never promised. Never miss an opportunity to tell your people you love them. You never know when it will be the last time.

Stay strong Orlando. I wish I could do more. My heart hurts with yours. And I will stand with you until we can figure out how to make the change we so desperately need. 

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Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.