The BEST Way To Prevent Running Injuries

Can we talk about the two words that for some reason, runners seem to fear? PHYSICAL THERAPY. If I had a dollar for every email I've ever received asking for advice about an ache, pain, or possible injury, I'd have more money than I'd know what to do with. I don't know why our immediate reaction whenever we hurt ourselves is to turn to the internet instead of a professional. I do it, just ask my Physical Therapist Mike Riccardi at Finish Line Physical Therapy. Whenever I feel a weird ache or pain, I Google it and show up to my weekly PT appointment with a list of possible diseases and illnesses. Then Mike promptly sighs and tells me that I'm fine, and it is just overuse. (And a result of my terrible running form and minimal foam rolling.)

Look, getting injured happens. Sometimes it's because we fail to cross train or do our strength training and sometimes accidents happen. I've had my fair share of running related injuries from calf strains, runners knee, to IT band flare ups and there's no way I'd be running as efficiently and pain free as I am today without Finish Line Physical Therapy. Their motto is prehab instead of rehab and I'm a believer. It's so much easier to be diligent about preventing injuries than it is to have to take time off to rehab them.

If you have the resources available to you, go find yourself an amazing Physical Therapist who doesn't frown upon endurance sports. Someone who understands your need to run and isn't going to tell you that it's bad for you. Those PT's are out there. Should you meet them, RUN! Then work with them to strengthen your weak areas so that you limit your chances of acquiring a running related injury.

ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT RUNNING RELATED INJURIES!

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

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Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

Finding Balance and Putting Myself First

I can't imagine what Mom's and Dad's go through when it comes to finding the time to run. My hat is off to all of you who struggle to find the time to put yourself first. For most of us, running is our saving grace. It's the thing we do to stay sane or to remind ourselves not to give up when the going gets tough. But sometimes, it's hard to keep all the balls in the air and when push comes to shove, 9 times out of 10, we make sacrifices and we stop putting ourselves first.

When it comes to training to qualify for the Boston Marathon (BQ), I've done a really lousy job at finding the balance between maintaining my social life, working insane hours, getting sleep, feeding myself, and running. Running always comes first. Always. But I'm fortunate, I'm in a position where I get to put running first and while I don't have kids to think about, it's still hard to find the time to be a normal 26 year old.

Finding the balance isn't impossible, it just takes extra work. I have to be diligent about managing my rest days and then making an effort to maintain my relationships and feel normal. I used to dread my rest days. I hated having time to myself. I would go stir crazy because I would much rather be running or working out. Today? I relish my rest days. I love my time away from running when I don't have to think about chafing, bad runs, energy gels, tempos, and paces. 

This weekend, I had some friends over for a little carb party to prepare for Saturday's 18 mile long run. We sat on the roof, talked about life, and ended up in bed pretty early because I had an early wake up call. Running should never be your life. It should always be the thing that makes your life even better. It's all about balance and that balance is different for everyone.

I'm lucky that I have friends and a sister who are willing to spend their time on a bike next to me while I do my long runs. Not only are they helping me MORE THAN THEY WILL EVER KNOW, but it almost always ends up being a really good time. Sometimes you have to be creative with your time and even though it's hard for me to be selfish and put myself first, I know it's what I need to do. I'll never BQ unless I give 100% and right now, that's my priority. It isn't always easy, but I know it's going to be worth it.

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

3 Comments

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

My Biggest Regret Is Not Believing In Myself

It was only 2 hours after I finished my first marathon that I decided that I wanted to run a sub 4 hour marathon. I was sitting in the back of my parent's car, head propped up by the window, physically exhausted, when my Dad asked me if I would ever run a marathon again. "Yes," I said back to him, "but next time, I want to do it under 4 hours." It took me 5 marathons to run a sub 4 and even when I did, I still didn't believe that I could do it.

The fact that I was afraid to fail is one of my biggest regrets. Looking back, I remember how hesitant I felt to announce that I was going to try. I was convinced that finishing a marathon with a smile on my face was enough of an accomplishment. And it is! Being able to run a marathon is an incredible accomplishment in and of itself but I couldn't help but want to see just how fast I could go. Then last year, when I ran the Berlin Marathon, I finished in 4 hours and 2 minutes, and I felt disappointed that I didn't 100% after my goal. I thought it would be an easier pill if I danced around the goal and just hoped it would happen.  

If I could go back in time, I'd commit 100% to running a sub 4. It hurts to remember how much I doubted myself. That's a part of the reason why I'm so nervous about my upcoming Boston Marathon qualifying (BQ) attempt during this year's Chicago Marathon. I'm all in. I'm doing everything I can to make it happen and I know that if I fall short, I'll still feel proud but I'm still afraid of failing. I know it's crazy but it's how I feel.

One things for sure, after last year, I'll never stop myself from fully committing to a goal again. I know I can do it, and I know that it may not happen on the first try. And if it doesn't, I'm not giving up. BQ or Bust!

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

1 Comment

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

The Only Thing Harder Than Trying To Qualify For The Boston Marathon

There is only one thing harder than trying to qualify for the Boston Marathon (BQ), and that's filming yourself while you're trying to qualify for the Boston Marathon. Every night, I sit down to my computer, upload all the footage I shot that day, and begin to relive the struggles, the speed bumps, and the doubts. You know that weird self conscious feeling you get when you hear the sound of your voice on film? Multiply that by 100 and you'll know how I feel when I have to watch myself pull back or give up during a workout.

I feel like a broken record when I say this, but I really didn't think the mental game was going to be this difficult. Issues I thought I'd left behind years ago are resurfacing and despite break through after break through, I find myself taking two steps forward and 100 steps back again, and again, and again.

But it isn't all bad. It's pretty incredible that I can go back to the beginning and see just how terrified I was when I took my first steps toward BQ'ing.

I know I can err on the dramatic side at times, but I was genuinely terrified those first few weeks. I didn't start to believe in myself until a few days ago. For weeks, I've been running towards a finish line I was positive that I wasn't going to cross. And you can see it in the way I talk about myself and what I'm capable of in the first couple of vlogs. But slowly, little by little, I start to break through. I'm finally starting to trust the training and believe in my strength and capabilities.

But the hardest part for me is having to watch myself stop myself from pushing forward like I did last night. I was four and a half miles into a progression run. It was hard but I felt strong. Then, during the final half mile, I felt like I might puke and I panicked. I stopped repeating "I can do this" and started thinking, "I want this to be over". Instead of pushing through the final 3 minutes, I dragged my feet and gave in to suffering. What's really hard is that I know better. I know how to push through discomfort but I chose to let everything bother me. Then having to watch myself suffer and choose not to finish strong was just really tough. 

Giving up is a really sensitive subject for me. The other day, my friend Chris reminded me that I need to want to BQ. That I need to know what I'm running for and at the time, I had an idea but I wasn't ready to admit it. I'm a quitter. When things get hard or when the water gets murky, I jump ship and run. (Pun intended kind of. It's the reason why I started running.) I don't like to ask for help and I feel confident when I'm in control. A little chaos and uncertainty I can handle but when I lose the tiny bit of control I thought I had, anxiety takes over and I quit.

I'm really afraid that I'm not going to BQ. I'm really nervous that I'm going to come up with enough excuses to give me an out. I'm terrified that I'm going to walk away knowing that I could have given more. I'm BESIDE MYSELF that I may let you all down. I don't know what the next 52 days will bring but I'm afraid. And I know this reaction is necessary because I care but I'm drowning in anxiety and I had to let you in on my not so secret secret.

Making these daily vlogs (HAVE YOU SUBSCRIBED TO MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL?) has been the greatest gift because trying to BQ is flying by. Training for a BQ attempt has been humbling and difficult on a million different levels and I feel really grateful that this experience, both the ups and the really low downs, are being preserved. It's hard to be this open and vulnerable with my mistakes and my doubts. At least on my blog, I can craft them however I'd like. But film doesn't lie! And that's terrifying but also totally liberating.

These next 52 days are going to be hard. Training is kicking up a gear and it's sink or swim time. I'm feeling nervous and uncertain about myself but the best way for me to deal with my anxieties is to be honest. In the light of day, when everything is off of my chest, I always feel less afraid.

kelly roberts fuck perfect work in progress

Thank you for coming along for the BQ Or Bust journey with me. It's so much easier knowing that I'm not in this alone. I am humbled and grateful beyond words.

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

3 Comments

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

Running In Hell-ishly Hot Temperatures

Holy sh*t. I feel like a cuss word is appropriate right now because this heat is savage. CAN WE TALK ABOUT THIS HEAT?!?! I mean MY GOD. When is it going to end!

Thank God this week was a "down" week (I put "down" in quotes because it was still a 40 mile week with speed work and a 15 mile run...did down week get redefined? Just checking because to me, down week has me on a slip and slide or a pool sipping a corona. JUST SAYING.) The heat ventured into unbearable territory on Thursday when we were at the track.

I literally felt like I was running through a steam room, that's how hot and humid it was. The workout was tough but short (THANK YOU JOSH) and my friend Megha was in town to chase which was a happy surprise. We took off pretty fast and on my last mile, I was really feeling the heat. My teammate Dom jumped in to help me finish my last lap and I know he could tell I was starting to suffer because he turns to me and says, "Don't give up on me". It clicked. The excuses didn't seem good enough and just by reminding me not to give up, I was able to power through.

Sometimes it's hard to remember why it's worth it when everything hurts and getting comfortable sounds so enticing. Yesterday I was talking to my friend Chris Heuisler about BQ training (BQ means Boston Marathon qualifying time) and he's become a really amazing resource for me. He magically gets in touch with me whenever I'm running into a mental block (RUNNING PUN) and he somehow knows EXACTLY what to say. Right before I got his text, I was reading Desi Linden's post Olympic marathon interview. In the interview, she was saying how she wasn't upset with her performance because she gave everything she had. I know that if I give everything I have in training and on race day, then there's no way I can fail but I still feel that fear of falling short. I still feel afraid of quitting on myself.

See? I told you. I'm afraid I'm a quitter. 

See? I told you. I'm afraid I'm a quitter. 

Chris reminded me that I have to want it that I need to know what I'm running for.

I've talked about this before but when things get really hard, I have a habit of quitting on myself and that's something running has helped me fight over the years. Trying to run a Boston qualifying time is really, really, really f*cking hard. But so was running my first half marathon! I'll never forget how close I came to walking off at mile 11 of my first half marathon. I was sure I wouldn't make it. But with the help of another runner, I finished. And I proved to myself that if I can take one more step, anything is possible. I just have to keep going forward. 

And this heat, though unbearable, kind of makes me feel like a badass. Sure it's hell in the moment but afterwards, I feel like an Olympian. 

Just finding the motivation to make it out the door in the heat feels impossible but you make it happen. You slow down, drink tons of water, try to run early (I fail in that department), find shade, and endure the mental games. It isn't easy or necessarily enjoyable but if you can find the fun in it, you'll survive.  

Summer running isn't easy friends but if we can survive the chafing, then our Fall personal bests are inevitable!

running chafing struggle

Just because something is hard doesn't mean that it's impossible. Believe in yourself, figure out what you're running for, and then do EVERYTHING you can to give 100%. (That's a pep talk to myself just FYI.)

We can do this. There's no giving up! 

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

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Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

How To Stop Caring If Strangers Think You're A Runner Or Not

Do you remember the last time someone acted surprised when they found out that you run? Maybe it happened once or maybe it happens daily; my question is, why do we care? 

you don't look like a runner

For years I felt self conscious about myself, my strength, and my identity as a runner. "I'm not a real runner" or "But I'm not fast" I'd say to anyone who raised their eyebrows when they found out that I ran. Even after I ran my first marathon, I would catch myself saying, "I ran the marathon, but I'm not REALLY a marathoner." I couldn't help myself! I cared way too much about what other people thought about me instead of focusing on how I felt about myself.

I see it all the time. It's one of the comments I see most frequently on my social media accounts from other runners. They tell me that people act surprised when they find out that they run because they don't look like your "stereotypical runner". The problem is, we have all come to this decision that someone who is in shape, or who can run, should look a certain way. You see it everyday in magazines or tweets like this -- 

The sooner we can acknowledge that the perfect A-List body is marketing and not something we should all strive for, the better off we'll be. Working out or losing weight just to look like a movie star won't solve your problems. I know because that's what I thought would happen when I changed my entire life to lose over 75 pounds. I thought that being skinny would make me happy or that it would make life easier for me. CURVE BALL, it didn't. It wasn't until I started running and in turn believing in myself and my strength that I started feeling confident, happy, and capable.

 I'm tired of seeing people feel like they need to look a certain way in order to feel good about themselves. The goal should never be to have an A-List body. Strength and confidence don't look a certain way. Being healthy isn't one size fits all. 

kelly roberts

Letting go of how much I cared about other people's opinions didn't happen overnight, it took a lot of proactive work on my part. We give so much of ourselves on long runs, on the track, on a bike, in the pool, or in the gym, and yet we do nothing to strengthen the way we see ourselves. Why? Why do we feel like we need to prove our strength and worth to anyone other than ourselves? It wasn't until I started actively looking in the mirror and celebrating what I liked or what made me proud that I stopped caring about what people might think about me.

Being able to run a certain distance or pace isn't what defines a runner. A runner is anyone who strives to put their strongest foot forward. It doesn't matter if that's a 30 minute mile or a 5 minute mile. Honestly, the people who inspire and motivate me the most aren't the people with perfect bodies. It's the people who don't believe they can run around their block and then make it happen. The runners who have defined themselves and what they're capable of and still set out to make a change. Trying to change who you think you are is one of the most difficult things you can do. That's why I'm not motivated or inspired by a finished product. I want to see a work in progress. 

Getting healthy shouldn't be about trying look a certain way, it's about being the best version of you possible both inside and out. If you want to stop caring about what other people think about you, you have to start believing in your own strength and potential. Until you can look in the mirror and feel proud of what you see because you know how hard you're working, you'll always feel hurt when someone is surprised when they find out that you run. Don't worry about proving yourself to anyone but yourself. You're strong, you're beautiful, and you're capable of anything. Life is all about putting one foot in front of the other. It's your job to make sure that you're putting your strongest foot forward. 

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

Comment

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

Do Cheaters Diminish Our Achievements?

Yesterday, a friend shared a link to a website dedicated towards catching runners who cheat their way into the Boston Marathon in a Facebook group that I'm apart of.  First and foremost, I have to say that I don't understand the motivation behind cheating during a race. I don't understand why anyone would want to cheat their way into the Boston Marathon when the entire point of qualifying for Boston is personal achievement. (So if you're a cheater, shoot me an email. I really just want to pick your brain.)

Bravo

Bravo

I misunderstood my friend's words. He wrote that he hoped he never saw any of us on the site and I assumed that he meant that he hoped none of us were associated with the website. I now think he may have meant that he hopes he never saw us cheating. I thought the former because it was obvious that none of us would cheat our way into Boston. I don't think I know anyone who cares that much (and also not enough) to cheat. I commented that I was embarrassed for everyone on the website because I find the community within the running world that leads these witch hunts and publicly shames bib swappers and cheaters equally disappointing. Race officials hire people to find course cutters, bib swappers, and cheaters. If you know someone cheated, why not just contact the race officials directly? (And who has time to investigate this sort of thing and curate a website about it if it's not your job? Between training to BQ, keeping Run, Selfie, Repeat alive, filming and editing vlogs, trying to stay in control on my email, and trying to feed myself, I don't have time to see my friends or date other humans so PLEASE tell me where your free time is coming from. Seriously. I would love to hear how you have so much free time. Here's my email, Kelly@RunSelfieRepeat.com)

My biggest issue is the online persecution and honestly, I take it personally. When I ran the 2014 NYC Half Marathon, the race that I went viral at, I bought a bib. I was about to breakup with the guy I was seeing and we were fighting about something, I was miserably surviving my first winter (which just so happened to be the worst one NYC had had in DECADES), I felt worthless and just wanted to run with the community that made me feel good about myself. I didn't plan on going viral and I didn't realize at the time that buying a bib was frowned upon. Today I understand why it's such a big deal. Buying a bib can be really dangerous. If something happens to a runner on the course and race officials can't identify who they are, they put everyone at risk. It sounds silly and I know most of us think "that will never happen to me" but I've seen it happen more times than I can count. It can and does happen and swapping bibs puts race officials who may be trying to save someone's life in a really dangerous situation. And people cheat which is also just stupid. Just don't swap or buy bibs. 

But back to why I don't agree with these online witch hunts, I was crucified online by these running websites and message boards because I had bought a bib. When I did an interview with Runner's World, they asked me if I bandit-ed the race. I had no clue what that meant and I stupidly said yes. People online wrote that they hoped I broke my leg and never ran again, killed myself, and said that I was an embarrassment to the running world. Which is more embarrassing, that I bought a bib and took selfies during a half marathon or someone writing online that they hoped I kill myself? Obviously the disappointing human who thought it was acceptable to tell me that they hoped I killed myself because I bought a bib. So when I see sites like that one, I can't help but feel disappointed in everyone involved because these sites are a breeding ground for an equally scummy portion of the running world.

What really made me think was the response to my comment by a friend of mine who I not only respect and look up to, but who is one of the nicest guys in the world. We have differing opinions on the site and what he said made me think. He said that the cheaters are diminishing my accomplishment and hard work to BQ and that they are taking spots away from people who rightfully earn their way into Boston. I 100% agree that it's unjust for someone who cheats or cheats the system to steal a spot rightfully earned by someone else. I agree that it's important they are caught and punished but I don't agree that their cheating diminishes my achievement.

I'm not trying to BQ to be impressive or to be able to boast about my accomplishment. I'm trying to BQ to prove to myself that I'm not a quitter and that I'm stronger than I give myself credit for. It's 100% for me and me alone. Someone else robbing themselves of that accomplishment doesn't diminish mine, it just makes them a disappointing cheater. It's sad that they don't believe in themselves enough to work for it. I feel bad for them. But their decision to cheat doesn't in any way, shape, or form have any reflection on my accomplishment or hard work.

I think that the most dangerous thing you can do while you're chasing any sort of goal is to do it for someone else. I think it needs to be personal and it needs to have huge stakes that keep you fighting when the doubts and discomfort set in and you start to question why you're making the sacrifices you're making. And I'm not saying you can't have other motivating factors. A huge motivating factor for me and my BQ attempt is Save The Children, the charity I'm raising money for and all the kids I want to support. Another motivating factor for me is all of you. Knowing that you're out there with me chasing down impossible goals as well in addition to supporting me every painful step of the way motivates me fight when I want to give up. But my main motivation is personal and it gets me out of bed every single morning.

Moral of the story, don't cheat and maybe do more with your time than participate in online witch hunts. Your words have power and I understand the disappointment and frustration but funnel it into your training. All you can do is focus on being the best version of yourself. And if you see something, say something. Just say something to someone in charge and not on a website or message board. 

Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

Comment

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.

The Running Mantra That Is Helping Me Push Through Discomfort

One of my greatest fears is that I'm a quitter. If I'm being totally honest, my habit of taking the easy road is the reason why running resonates so deeply with me. Running taught me that just because something feels difficult or even impossible doesn't mean that it's not something worth pursuing. You can't fake your way through a half or full marathon, you have to do the work and running has helped me realize that I can't live myself playing it safe or trying to be perfect. If you work hard and believe in yourself, just about anything really is possible.

No one likes to fail but I really believe that the only way you'll fail is if you fail to try. Goals are great but when you focus only on an end result, you throw patience out the window and you're destined for a tough time. I know because for weeks, I've been worried about my goal Boston Marathon qualifying goal instead of just focusing on where I'm at in the process or what my Coach has put on my training plan today. I know better but sometimes fear is louder than reason.

I've been struggling a lot with doubt and my own personal self imposed limits but one mantra that has helped me stay present when I want to pull back so that I can catch my breath is, "I can do this". Those four words have helped me give every run, regardless of how difficult it is, the good ol' college try. Something Dr. Bob said to me that really made sense was being mindful of when I feel unsure of myself. That doubts are normal, it's up to me that I still give every intimidating run my best effort.  

These past 3 months of BQ training have been transformative, challenging, painful and exhilarating and we're only half way there! The only thing I know for sure is that I'm wasting my time if I don't believe that I can do this. It isn't always easy to believe in yourself but if I don't, why should I expect anyone else to? 

 Until next time, #RunSelfieRepeat.

Comment

Kelly Roberts

My name is Kelly Roberts and I am a 25 year old New York City resident. My story made headlines when I took selfies with hot guys “hottie hunting” my way through the NYC Half Marathon. My blog, www.RunSelfieRepeat.com is bursting with humor and personal stories that lend an insight into the world of running and lead you to believe that just about anyone, regardless of their fitness level, can and should fall in love with running. Though currently an avid runner, I never would have predicted I would run marathons. I was the kid who used to hide in the bushes or play dead to get out of running the mile in school. I HATED running. But running has given me a purpose. It’s shown me that I really am limitless. In the two years since I started running, I’ve run multiple half marathons, 10ks, and 5ks, and two full marathons. My mission is to inspire others to find the courage to say yes to themselves all the while making them laugh hysterically because laughing is the solution to everything.